Anatomy of a Plan – Journey’s End

It has been a really long time since I published an installment in my “Anatomy of a Plan” series, so here is a new one!

During the early years of Bramalea, one of the more popular bungalow designs was called the Journey’s End. The layout had a lasting legacy in Bramalea, as many of the bungalow and back-split designs built over the years are a variation on this design.

i

j
c. 1964-1967, B and D-Section.

The layout of the Journey’s End has an L-Shaped living and dining room combination, with the kitchen tucked in to the crux of the L shape and the entry and staircase beside the living room. At the back of the house are 3 bedrooms, with the bathroom located behind the kitchen. Much like many designs in Bramalea, the roots of such a layout can be found in the historic Foursquare plan for 2-storey houses (see the post on my other blog: The Enduring Foursquare). This 2-storey layout was essentially adapted to a one-storey design with the bedrooms placed behind the living spaces instead of above them. Please also see my older post on the Raised Bungalow in Bramalea.

A key feature of this design is that there is a back door located behind the staircase to the basement. As you will see, in later (and narrower) incarnations of this design a back door is not possible, so the only way to the back yard is often only through a side door. This is common issue with many bungalow and back-split designs with the bedrooms at the back of the house.

The basic layout of the Journey’s End was reproduced well in to the 1970s under different names, but with the same basic layout:

016

c. 1970-1972, G-Section.

004
c. 1971-1972, G-Section.
e
c. 1970s, M-Section.

The Journey’s End design was also adapted as a back-split. The layout is similar, except for the stairs are moved to the middle of the house to link the change in levels at the back of the plan. The door to the yard is now a side door tucked in behind the garage with access to the basement stairs.

0052c. 1964-1965, B-Section.

003
c. 1971-1972, G-Section.

The Prides Fancy design below is slightly different as the bathroom is located behind the dining room, but still follows the same basic layout. Unfortunately, my only copy of the plan is cut off at the top.

0062
c. 1964-1965, B-Section.

In some of the back-split variations, the garage is moved to the living room side of the house.

018
c. 1970-1972, G-Section.

c

d
c. 1972, G-Section.
f (2)
c. 1970s, M-Section.

The layout was also adapted as a semi-detached design in both bungalow and back-split versions, both with and without a garage. Notice how the Vanity Flair design does not have a back door to the yard; instead there is a side door near the front of the house.

f
1962-1965, C and D-Section.

Many semi-detached variations of the design have the bathroom behind the kitchen or staircase, yet the same L-shape arrangement of living and dining rooms remain.

t
c. 1962-1965, C and D-Section.
l (2)
c. 1962-1965, C and D-Section.
003 (2)
c. 1971-1972, G-Section.
004 (2)

c. 1971-1972, G-Section.

005 (3)

c. 1971-1972, G-Section.

By the 1980s the popularity of such a design for newly-built houses in Bramalea began to wane as bungalows and split level houses became less common. Yet, hints of the basic layout still appeared in some designs:

001

c. 1979-1980, P-Section/Professor’s Lake.

026

027

c. 1980-1982, L-Section.

There are likely many other designs in Bramalea similar to the Journey’s End – these are just a sampling. If you know of any others, I would love to hear from you!

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